Professor Paul takes a moment to consider the recent and ongoing fight in Virginia. The responsible patriots exercised their inalienable 1st Amendment rights to petition for redress of grievances. Where do we go from here?

During our Brownells Bullet Points, we consider a bit of AR-180 history. Then we discuss some options available to the modern gun owner. Are you ready to build your own AR-180 replica?

How important is it to be dangerous on demand? One father in New Hampshire learned the lesson the hard way when a coyote attacked his two-year-old son during a recent family outing. Paul introduces a new way to carry your gun from Crossbreed Holsters. All that and more from the SHOT Show 2020 during this episode.

Thanks for being a part of SOTG! We hope you find value in the message we share. If you’ve got any questions, here are some options to contact us:

Enjoy the show! And remember…
You’re a Beginner Once, a Student For Life!


Topics Covered During This Episode:


VIDEOS:

  1. https://youtu.be/YSg4UXWwiwY?t=3s
  2. https://youtu.be/DVLStumDzOE

FEATURING: American Rifleman, DISRN, Brownells, Crossbreed Holsters, Madison Rising, Jarrad Markel, Paul G. Markel, SOTG University

PARTNERS: Brownells Inc, Crossbreed Holsters, Century Arms, SWAT Fuel, DuraCoat Firearm Finishes

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SOURCES

From www.americanrifleman.org:

Among many AR aficionados, it is believed that piston-driven rifles are a distinct improvement of direct-gas-impingement rifles like the ArmaLite-designed AR-15/M16. They like to quote many early Vietnam War-era marines who sniffed “Why would anyone want a rifle that bleeps where it feeds?”

Those guys had a point at the time. The AR-15 (M16) was designed with ammo loaded with stick powders, but when the ammo contracts were awarded the GI ammo was loaded with ball powders which were much dirtier in terms of residue than the powders used in the development of the rifle. Consequently, the M16 had a well-deserved early reputation for jamming.

Former Marine and former Army Ordnance technician Eugene Stoner is considered the father of the AR-15 (M16), and he quickly realized the shortcomings of the gas-impingement system. Stoner’s final rifle design for ArmaLite, the 7.62-cal. AR-16 rifle combined his notions for improvement of the design utilizing David “Carbine” Williams’ short-stroke, gas-piston in a better caliber.

The AR-16 was an effort to supply the U.S. military with a battle rifle less expensive to produce than the Garand or M14 rifles. However, soon after the adoption of the M14 rifle, Stoner left ArmaLite.

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